The Snapback Slim Deluxe, A Minimalist Leather Wallet

PHOTOS: Jacob Tender

PHOTOS: Jacob Tender

The Snapback Slim Wallet is my favorite wallet. I carry my wallet in my front pocket and hate clutter there. I have a swiss army-like key-holder for all of the doors in my life and I needed a wallet to match my minimalistic desire for a simpler way. Nick Augeri's wallet design matched my needs perfectly in 2013 and continues to now, 3 iterations deep.

In 2013, the Snapback Slim Wallet was brought to life by 239 backers on Kickstarter, collectively pledging $11,000. I was one of those, pledging $17 for "the early bird" reward tier. I grabbed an "innovator" reward tier for $15 in 2014 as the Snapback Slim 2.0 made its way onto Kickstarter as well. 806 backers pledged $18,690 to make that happen.

2015's campaign was the Snapback Slim Deluxe, an Italian leather collection based on the initial design. It took just 132 backers to top its goal and gross the project $7,288. I chipped in $89 to get both the Deluxe Sleeve and Deluxe Bi-Fold versions of the wallet. I've spent some time reviewing each of them and comparing them to past Snapbacks. Let's get into it.

In Augeri's video introduction to the first incarnation of the wallet, he demonstrated 9 cards sliding "nice and easy" into the secure-tabbed pocket. The ability to do that did not change in the second iteration of the wallet, but it certainly did in the third. The Deluxe is made out of "Premium Italian Leather," something I admittedly know very little about despite the leather-working merit badge I earned in Boy Scouts. Because of the material, the elasticity that made the Snapback 1 and 2 so great has been lost. The same number of cards still fit, but it's not as easy to get them in or out. Still, the leather looks nice although rigid. I think perhaps some time in my pocket will soften it up a bit.

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The Snapback Slim Deluxe Sleeve may have been inspired by the minimalist concept of the original Snapback wallet, but it adds complexity. Instead of 1 expandable pocket, the Deluxe features 1 large pocket for cash and 2 slots for cards. I've done my best to duplicate the order of my cards by putting my debit card and ID in the first position in respective sleeves, allowing easy access. That said, removing the cards isn't as easy as it was on my former wallet. It takes a pinch to remove some of the cards from their sleeves, whereas on the simpler Snapback 2.0, I just needed to slide out the end cards with my thumb. Despite the the added layers of leather, the thickness of the wallet in comparison to its predecessor is the same.

The Snapback Slim Deluxe Bi-Fold is something entirely new to the Snapback line. The Bi-fold contains two face-out card sleeves, two hidden inner pockets, and one classic Snapback strap. The layout of the wallet is clean and simplistic for its utility and is likely one of the slimmest bi-folds you'll find. I opted to use one card in each sleeve, putting the rest in the hidden slots and saving the band for cash, gift cards, and my many Mexican restaurant punch cards.

Containing the same number of cards, the Deluxe Sleeve is only 2/3 as thick as its bi-fold brother, making the decision of which to carry a difficult one. While I prefer the layout of the bi-fold, I still maintain the strong desire for a minimalistic wallet—making the sleeve the stronger option. It's my hope that carrying the sleeve will soften the leather and loosen its grip on my cards just enough to make them more accessible.

Once again, Nick Augeri has released a quality product. These aren't his most innovative wallets, but they add a level of class to the lineup. It's possible I'll end back up with the Snapback 2.0—which has held up remarkably well over the past year— but I love the look of a leather wallet and these are the best I've ever owned.